Khumbila, God of Khumbu in Sherpa language, is the holiest mountain to the Sherpas. Here it is seen for the first time while crossing the Dudh Kosi (milk river) on the way to Namche Bazaar.

Khumbila, God of Khumbu in Sherpa language, is the holiest mountain to the Sherpas. Here it is seen for the first time while crossing the Dudh Kosi (milk river) on the way to Namche Bazaar.

 In the village of Phortse, just across the valley from Khumbila, all men of working age are in mountaineering. Most have summited Everest.

In the village of Phortse, just across the valley from Khumbila, all men of working age are in mountaineering. Most have summited Everest.

 A Sherpa porter carries bags out of Phortse on his way to Everest base camp. Porters are poorly paid, but the only option for many young men.

A Sherpa porter carries bags out of Phortse on his way to Everest base camp. Porters are poorly paid, but the only option for many young men.

 Ang Phuti, left, and her husband Ang Dawa are one of the oldest couples in Phortse. 

Ang Phuti, left, and her husband Ang Dawa are one of the oldest couples in Phortse. 

 Lhakpa Ganji Sherpa suffered extreme frostbite when he was caught in an avalanche on Mt. Everest many years ago. He now has only two fingers on his right hand, and struggles to walk.

Lhakpa Ganji Sherpa suffered extreme frostbite when he was caught in an avalanche on Mt. Everest many years ago. He now has only two fingers on his right hand, and struggles to walk.

 Karma Chhering carries his prayer beads with him as he tends to his yak herd. Most Sherpa are Nyingmapa Buddhist and depend on the village Lamas for spiritual guidance and religious rituals.

Karma Chhering carries his prayer beads with him as he tends to his yak herd. Most Sherpa are Nyingmapa Buddhist and depend on the village Lamas for spiritual guidance and religious rituals.

 Yaks make their way back into Phortse from the fields at sunset.

Yaks make their way back into Phortse from the fields at sunset.

 Sonam Sherpa makes Omeecha (milk tea) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

Sonam Sherpa makes Omeecha (milk tea) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

 Sonam makes Shakpa (sherpa stew) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

Sonam makes Shakpa (sherpa stew) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

 Boiled potatoes are a cheap, easy lunch meal for the first day of tilling the fields. 

Boiled potatoes are a cheap, easy lunch meal for the first day of tilling the fields. 

 A basket of potatoes sits on the edge of a field before ladies begin planting in Phortse. 

A basket of potatoes sits on the edge of a field before ladies begin planting in Phortse. 

 A group of ladies work in teams to plant potatoes. While one digs, another throws potatoes into the hole.

A group of ladies work in teams to plant potatoes. While one digs, another throws potatoes into the hole.

 Pasang, left, and Tashi till in one of Tashi's fields in Phortse.

Pasang, left, and Tashi till in one of Tashi's fields in Phortse.

 A Sherpa woman works on levelling the dirt and burying any uncovered potatoes as the evening fog rolls into Phortse.

A Sherpa woman works on levelling the dirt and burying any uncovered potatoes as the evening fog rolls into Phortse.

 A climber crests the hill above Phortse on his way to Pangboche and Everest Base Camp.

A climber crests the hill above Phortse on his way to Pangboche and Everest Base Camp.

 Merchants sell flour at the weekend market in Namche Bazaar.

Merchants sell flour at the weekend market in Namche Bazaar.

 A butcher takes a break outside the meat house during the weekend bazaar in Namche. Butchers still use traditional Khukuri for cutting meat.

A butcher takes a break outside the meat house during the weekend bazaar in Namche. Butchers still use traditional Khukuri for cutting meat.

 A butcher uses a khukuri to cut meat during the weekend bazaar in Namche.

A butcher uses a khukuri to cut meat during the weekend bazaar in Namche.

 A Lama from Tengboche performs a Puja at Tashi Sherpa's house. Pujas are common at home or at Tengboche to bless the families and hope they come back safely at the end of the season.

A Lama from Tengboche performs a Puja at Tashi Sherpa's house. Pujas are common at home or at Tengboche to bless the families and hope they come back safely at the end of the season.

 Pasang Sherpa listens intently to find the rhythm for his drumming during a puja at his family's house.

Pasang Sherpa listens intently to find the rhythm for his drumming during a puja at his family's house.

 A Lama from Tengboche Monastery prepares a plate of flour for use during a Puja ceremony in Phortse.

A Lama from Tengboche Monastery prepares a plate of flour for use during a Puja ceremony in Phortse.

 Fifth graders study for finals in Phortse. If families can afford it, this year's graduates will be send to Khumjung or Kathmandu to continue school.

Fifth graders study for finals in Phortse. If families can afford it, this year's graduates will be send to Khumjung or Kathmandu to continue school.

 Pemba Sherpa smiles as she learns to play duck-duck-goose in Phortse.

Pemba Sherpa smiles as she learns to play duck-duck-goose in Phortse.

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 The town of Phortse, with Khumbila looming over it on the other side of the valley.

The town of Phortse, with Khumbila looming over it on the other side of the valley.

 Khumbila, God of Khumbu in Sherpa language, is the holiest mountain to the Sherpas. Here it is seen for the first time while crossing the Dudh Kosi (milk river) on the way to Namche Bazaar.
 In the village of Phortse, just across the valley from Khumbila, all men of working age are in mountaineering. Most have summited Everest.
 A Sherpa porter carries bags out of Phortse on his way to Everest base camp. Porters are poorly paid, but the only option for many young men.
 Ang Phuti, left, and her husband Ang Dawa are one of the oldest couples in Phortse. 
 Lhakpa Ganji Sherpa suffered extreme frostbite when he was caught in an avalanche on Mt. Everest many years ago. He now has only two fingers on his right hand, and struggles to walk.
 Karma Chhering carries his prayer beads with him as he tends to his yak herd. Most Sherpa are Nyingmapa Buddhist and depend on the village Lamas for spiritual guidance and religious rituals.
 Yaks make their way back into Phortse from the fields at sunset.
 Sonam Sherpa makes Omeecha (milk tea) for the ladies tending his family's fields.
 Sonam makes Shakpa (sherpa stew) for the ladies tending his family's fields.
 Boiled potatoes are a cheap, easy lunch meal for the first day of tilling the fields. 
 A basket of potatoes sits on the edge of a field before ladies begin planting in Phortse. 
 A group of ladies work in teams to plant potatoes. While one digs, another throws potatoes into the hole.
 Pasang, left, and Tashi till in one of Tashi's fields in Phortse.
 A Sherpa woman works on levelling the dirt and burying any uncovered potatoes as the evening fog rolls into Phortse.
 A climber crests the hill above Phortse on his way to Pangboche and Everest Base Camp.
 Merchants sell flour at the weekend market in Namche Bazaar.
 A butcher takes a break outside the meat house during the weekend bazaar in Namche. Butchers still use traditional Khukuri for cutting meat.
 A butcher uses a khukuri to cut meat during the weekend bazaar in Namche.
 A Lama from Tengboche performs a Puja at Tashi Sherpa's house. Pujas are common at home or at Tengboche to bless the families and hope they come back safely at the end of the season.
 Pasang Sherpa listens intently to find the rhythm for his drumming during a puja at his family's house.
 A Lama from Tengboche Monastery prepares a plate of flour for use during a Puja ceremony in Phortse.
 Fifth graders study for finals in Phortse. If families can afford it, this year's graduates will be send to Khumjung or Kathmandu to continue school.
 Pemba Sherpa smiles as she learns to play duck-duck-goose in Phortse.
Nepal030.JPG
Nepal034.JPG
Phortse018.JPG
Phortse020.JPG
Phortse021.JPG
Phortse022.JPG
Phortse024.JPG
Phortse029.JPG
 The town of Phortse, with Khumbila looming over it on the other side of the valley.

Khumbila, God of Khumbu in Sherpa language, is the holiest mountain to the Sherpas. Here it is seen for the first time while crossing the Dudh Kosi (milk river) on the way to Namche Bazaar.

In the village of Phortse, just across the valley from Khumbila, all men of working age are in mountaineering. Most have summited Everest.

A Sherpa porter carries bags out of Phortse on his way to Everest base camp. Porters are poorly paid, but the only option for many young men.

Ang Phuti, left, and her husband Ang Dawa are one of the oldest couples in Phortse. 

Lhakpa Ganji Sherpa suffered extreme frostbite when he was caught in an avalanche on Mt. Everest many years ago. He now has only two fingers on his right hand, and struggles to walk.

Karma Chhering carries his prayer beads with him as he tends to his yak herd. Most Sherpa are Nyingmapa Buddhist and depend on the village Lamas for spiritual guidance and religious rituals.

Yaks make their way back into Phortse from the fields at sunset.

Sonam Sherpa makes Omeecha (milk tea) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

Sonam makes Shakpa (sherpa stew) for the ladies tending his family's fields.

Boiled potatoes are a cheap, easy lunch meal for the first day of tilling the fields. 

A basket of potatoes sits on the edge of a field before ladies begin planting in Phortse. 

A group of ladies work in teams to plant potatoes. While one digs, another throws potatoes into the hole.

Pasang, left, and Tashi till in one of Tashi's fields in Phortse.

A Sherpa woman works on levelling the dirt and burying any uncovered potatoes as the evening fog rolls into Phortse.

A climber crests the hill above Phortse on his way to Pangboche and Everest Base Camp.

Merchants sell flour at the weekend market in Namche Bazaar.

A butcher takes a break outside the meat house during the weekend bazaar in Namche. Butchers still use traditional Khukuri for cutting meat.

A butcher uses a khukuri to cut meat during the weekend bazaar in Namche.

A Lama from Tengboche performs a Puja at Tashi Sherpa's house. Pujas are common at home or at Tengboche to bless the families and hope they come back safely at the end of the season.

Pasang Sherpa listens intently to find the rhythm for his drumming during a puja at his family's house.

A Lama from Tengboche Monastery prepares a plate of flour for use during a Puja ceremony in Phortse.

Fifth graders study for finals in Phortse. If families can afford it, this year's graduates will be send to Khumjung or Kathmandu to continue school.

Pemba Sherpa smiles as she learns to play duck-duck-goose in Phortse.

The town of Phortse, with Khumbila looming over it on the other side of the valley.

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